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Live in Florida and shopping for an Automated External Defibrillator -  AED?  Need AED Supplies such as batteries and electrode pads, AED Service, Repair or CPR AED Training?  We can help!  Please call 561-762-0500 for more information and pricing.

The CPR School, LLC is a Florida based company that specializes in CPR, First Aid and Automated External Defibrillators (AED).  We offer great prices, service, maintenance and AED training.  

What is an AED?
An Automated External Defibrillator or AED is a portable electronic device that automatically diagnoses the potentially life threatening cardiac arrhythmias of ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia in a patient.  The AED is able to treat the patient by application of electrical therapy which stops the arrhythmia, allowing the heart to re-establish an effective rhythm.  AEDs are designed to be simple so that anyone can use one.  Proper use of an AED is taught in our CPR first aid classes.

What are the benefits of owning an AED?
Without the AED the chances of surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) outside of a hospital setting are very small – less than 5%. However, if the AED is applied to the victim quickly their odds increase to about 70% - 90%

Why should I buy an AED?
According to the American Heart Association, sudden cardiac arrest claims about 340,000 lives each year – or around 1,000 every day in the United States.  Sudden cardiac arrest, which is the leading cause of death in the United States kills more people than breast cancer, lung cancer, and AIDS combined. Currently 95 percent of all cardiac arrest victims

Who needs an AED?
Homeowners Associations, Hotels, Motels, Country Clubs, Golf Courses, Tennis Clubs, Yacht Clubs, Restaurants, Night Clubs, Dental Offices, Doctor's Offices, Grocery Stores, Health Clubs & Gyms, Little League teams, Sports teams, Elementary Schools, Middle Schools, High Schools, Colleges and more.

What does OSHA indicate about AEDs?
"Because the use of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) can save the lives of workers who experience cardiac arrest while on the job, OSHA today encouraged employers to consider making this equipment available in their workplace."
US Department of Labor, Office of Public Affairs, Dec. 17, 2001

What about Federal Laws regarding the use of AEDs?
The Cardiac Arrest Survival Act (CASA) of 2000 is our nation's first legislation recognizing the lifesaving role played by automated external defibrillators (AEDs).  The law highlights the need to make AEDs accessible to anyone who has had proper training, not just professional medical personnel.  The law protects trained AED users from liability, and also protects any person who has maintained the device, provided training, tested the device or acquired it.  The law also augments existing state "Good Samaritan" laws by ensuring federal liability protection for trained users and purchasers of AEDs.

Liability - Am I safer with or without an AED?
Florida is a very litigious state.  Attorneys are advertising everywhere and many people view filing lawsuits as hitting the lottery.  But not having an AED may put you at greater than owning one.  The increasing number of AEDs in public places, coupled with the fact that AEDS dramatically increase cardiac arrest survival rates may establish a standard of care.  If the property down the road has an AED program in place to save lives, why doesn’t your property offer the same protection?

Signed into federal law in 2000, the Cardiac Arrest Survival Act (CASA) provides limited immunity from civil liability for those who acquire or use an AED if the state has not otherwise granted immunity for such persons under other statutes.

Is my business or association required to have an AED on property?
Ordinances and laws vary by city and state.  Coral Gables, Coral Springs, Davie, Plantation, Sunrise and Parkland all have an AED ordinance requiring Automated External Defibrillators (AED) in many businesses.  These ordinances typically require restaurants, hotels, health clubs, movie theaters and retail stores.  Ordinances and laws vary by location and business.

Will my health insurance cover an Automated External Defibrillator or AED?
There are some medical conditions that may meet the criteria for medical necessity for an Automated External Defibrillator.  If a physician determines that the Automated External Defibrillator is medically necessary, a letter written on the physician’s letterhead may help an insurance carrier or other payer to understand the patient’s situation.  Please note - Due to the wide range of health insurance policies and patient conditions, The CPR School cannot guarantee that an insurance company will cover or pay for your AED.

Do you sell AEDs wholesale or retail?
The majority of our customers are retail buyers, purchasing 1-6 AEDs at a time.  We do however offer discounts to resellers and large volume buyers.

We have an AED that does not work.  Can you repair it?
Yes, many of our customers have AEDs that are no longer working properly.  Often times we are able to upgrade the software, replace the old batteries and AED electrode pads and get them back into service.  If the AED requires additional work, we will contact the manufacturer to see if the problem is covered under warranty.   If you have an AED that is not working, call us.  You have nothing to lose.

We have several older AEDs and want to trade them in.  Do you accept trade ins?
Yes, we will take your old AEDs on trade for new ones.  Please call us to discuss.

Do you offer AED training and who teached the classes?
Yes, we offer training.  Keith Murray is the owner of The CPR School, LLC.   Keith is a former Florida EMT Firefighter with over 20 years training experience.  Keith holds a masters degree from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania and has instructed people of all ages and backgrounds including high school students, college students, professional groups, trade groups, hotel and resort workers, doctors, dentists, dental hygienists, condo associations, airline pilots, flight attendants, government employees and just about any other group you can imagine.  Keith recently used his CPR AED skills to save a traveler in the Atlanta airport.  Please click on the following link to read the story http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07340/839484-55.stm

Why do we need training, can’t we just dial 911 and wait for emergency medical personnel?
Sudden cardiac arrest, which is the leading cause of death in the United States kills more people than breast cancer, lung cancer, and AIDS combined.  Currently 95 percent of all cardiac arrest victims die.  Without quick action, your victim will almost certainly die.

Can anyone teach CPR AED and First Aid?
This is a common mistake I often see.  In an effort to reduce costs, managers either go with the low bid or attempt to do the training in house.  You should never cut costs on life saving training or life saving equipment.  Would you have your maintenance man install your fire suppression system?  Would you have human resources test and inspect your fire extinguishers?  The answer is no, you would not.  Both fire suppression systems and fire extinguishers are designed to save property.  CPR AED and first aid classes are designed to save lives.  Given the choice between saving lives or saving property, which in your opinion is more important and which do you think could result in the greatest liability?  Make certain your instructor is a full time instructor that has actually performed CPR and used AEDs in real life on real people.  Having people teach CPR that have never done CPR on real people is like taking golfing lessons from a guy that has never really played golf before.  Bottom line – always hire a full time professional.

Who should be CPR AED and First Aid Certified?
Everyone is my answer.  Training should include everyone that has access to the AED and anyone that may be asked to respond to medical emergencies.

Zoll AED DefibrillatorWhat if I already own an AED and need a new AED battery or electrode pads.
We sell AED batteries and AED electrodes pads for your AED.  Including the following brands.  Medtronic Physio Control CR Plus Charge-Pak 3201616-002 * Medronic Physi Control Battery Pak 3005380-026 * Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Battery 9146-001 * Powerheart Adult Pads 9131-001 * Heartsine Samaritan Battery and Pad (PadPak) Pad-Pak-01 * Defibtech Lifeline AED Battery DCF-200 * Defibtech AED Adult Pads Electrodes DDP-100, * Philips OnSite Adult Smart Pads M5071A * OnSite Pediatric/Child Smart Pads M5072A * Philips OnSite frx Standard Battery M5070A * Philips FRX Smart Pads II 989803139261 * Philips FR2 Adult Defibrillator Pads 989803158211 * Zoll AED Plus CPR-D Padz 8900-0800-01 * Zoll AED Plus Pedi-Padz II 8900-0810-01 * Welch Allyn

How do I contact The CPR School, LLC to buy an AED or schedule a training class?
The best way to do this is to call us at 561-762-0500.  You can also e-mail us at Keith@TheCPRSchool.com.

Where are you located?
Our office is located in Palm Beach County / Jupiter Florida.  We are within a few hours of West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Tampa, Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando and Daytona Florida.

Name types of businesses that you have helped with AEDs and Training?
- Airlines - both small plans, jets and large aircraft
- Banks
- Hotels and Resorts
- Campgrounds and RV Parks
- Dental Offices
- Medical Offices
- Yachts, Fishing Boats, Charter Boats and Cruise Ships
- Construction Companies
- Manufacturing Firms
- Gated Communities
- Assisted Living Facilites
- Non Profit Groups
- Churches
- Gated Communites, Condo and HOAs
- Marina's
- Govenrment Agencies and Utilites
- Engineering Firms
- Trucking, Transportation and Shipping Companies
- And many more

What is the danger of purchasing the wrong AED?
If you or someone you know purchased an Access CardioSystems AED you already know the answer.  Access CardioSystems discontinued manufacturing and marketing ALL models of its AEDs and discontinued supporting its AEDs.  All consumable components (specifically disposable battery packs and electrode sets) used with its AEDs are no longer available, these AEDs cannot be serviced or repaired. These AEDs are now unusable junk.  Imagine the purchasing agent that decided to buy this brand for his or her company only to find out they bought worthless safety equipment with no value.  Talk to someone in Florida that knows AEDs - not some salesperson in another state or another country.  Let us help you select the right AED for your Florida business.

We provide professional American Heart Association, ASHI and ECSI CPR AED First Aid Safety training classes.  We provide onsite group trainings at your business.  To learn more please call Keith @ 561-762-0500 or visit our training website http://www.TheCPRSchool.com  

All of our training meets the 2006 American Heart Association guidelines.

Funny - Candid Camera Basic Life Support Video

It starts out as a normal CPR Training class in Germany, but the students get a surprise when the manikin comes to life
[Click here to view video]

Locations Covered
The majority of our customers are in South and Central Florida including:

Palm Beach County Florida - City of Pahokee, City of Belle Glade, City of South Bay, Village of Tequesta, Town of Jupiter Inlet Colony, Town of Jupiter, Town of Juno Beach, City of Palm Beach Gardens, Village of North Palm Beach, Town of Lake Park, City of Riviera Beach, Town of Palm Beach Shores, Town of Mangonia Park, Town of Palm Beach, City of West Palm Beach, Town of Haverhill, Town of Glen Ridge, Town of Cloud Lake, Village of Palm Springs, Town of Lake Clarke Shores, Village of Royal Palm Beach, Village of Wellington, City of Greenacres, City of Atlantis, City of Lake Worth, Town of South Palm Beach, Town of Lantana, Town of Manalapan, Town of Hypoluxo, City of Boynton Beach, Town of Ocean Ridge, Village of Golf, Town of Briny Breezes, Town of Gulf Stream, City of Delray Beach, Town of Highland Beach, City of Boca Raton, Town of Loxahatchee Groves.
Broward County Florida - City of Parkland, City of Coconut Creek, City of Deerfield Beach, City of Coral Springs, City of Margate, City of Pompano Beach, City of Lighthouse Point, Town of Hillsboro Beach, City of Tamarac, City of North Lauderdale, Town of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Village of Sea Ranch Lakes, City of Oakland Park, City of Wilton Manors, Village of Lazy Lake,  City of Fort Lauderdale, City of Lauderdale Lakes, City of Lauderhill, City of Sunrise, City of Plantation, City of Weston, Town of Davie, City of Dania Beach, City of Hollywood, Town of Southwest Ranches, City of Cooper City, City of Pembroke Pines, City of Miramar, City of West Park, Town of Pembroke Park, City of Hallandale Beach.
Miami-Dade County Florida – Aventura, Bal Harbour, Bay Harbor Islands, Biscayne Park, Coral Gables, Cutler Bay, Doral, El Portal, Florida City, Golden Beach, Hialeah, Hialeah Gardens, Homestead, Indian Creek, Islandia, Key Biscayne, Medley, Miami, Miami Beach, Miami Gardens, Miami Lakes, Miami Shores, Miami Springs, North Bay Village, North Miami, North Miami Beach, Opa-locka, Palmetto Bay, Pinecrest, South Miami, Surfside, Sunny Isles Beach, Sweetwater, Virginia Gardens, West Miami
Martin County Florida - Town of Jupiter Island, Town of Ocean Breeze Park, Town of Sewall's Point, City of Stuart, Hobe Sound, Hutchinson Island part, Indiantown, Jensen Beach, North River Shores, Palm City, Port Salerno, Rio, Port Mayaca.
Okeechobee County Florida - Cypress Quarters, Taylor Creek, Ancient Oaks, Catterson, Sunset Strip, Barber Quarters, Basinger, Basswood Estates, Dixie Ranch Acres, Fort Drum, Hilolo, Mildred, Sherman, Treasure Island, Upthegrove Beach.
Orange County Florida - City of Apopka, Plymouth, City of Belle Isle, Town of Eatonville, City of Edgewood, City of Maitland, Town of Oakland, City of Ocoee, City of Orlando, Town of Windermere, City of Winter Garden, City of Winter Park, City of Bay Lake (part of Walt Disney World), City of Lake Buena Vista.
Osceola County Florida – City of Kissimmee, City of St. Cloud, Yeehaw Junction, Celebration
Brevard County Florida - City of Cape Canaveral, City of Cocoa, City of Cocoa Beach, Town of Grant-Valkaria, Town of Indialantic, City of Indian Harbour Beach, Town of Malabar, City of Melbourne, Town of Melbourne Beach, Town of Melbourne Village, City of Palm Bay, Town of Palm Shores, City of Rockledge, City of Satellite Beach, City of Titusville, City of West Melbourne
Seminiole County Florida - City of Altamonte Springs, City of Casselberry, City of Lake Mary, City of Longwood, City of Oviedo, City of Sanford, City of Winter Springs
Volusia County Florida - City of Daytona Beach, City of Daytona Beach Shores, City of DeBary, City of DeLand, City of Deltona, City of Edgewater, City of Holly Hill, City of Lake Helen, City of New Smyrna Beach, City of Oak Hill, City of Orange City, City of Ormond Beach, Town of Pierson, Town of Ponce Inlet, City of Port Orange, City of South Daytona.
Lake County Florida – Town of Astatula, City of Clermont, City of Eustis, City of Fruitland Park, City of Groveland, Town of Howey-in-the-Hills, Town of Lady Lake, City of Leesburg, City of Mascotte, City of Minneola, Town of Montverde, City of Mount Dora, City of Tavares, City of Umatilla
Polk County Florida - City of Auburndale, City of Bartow, City of Davenport, Town of Dundee, City of Eagle Lake, City of Fort Meade, City of Frostproof, City of Haines City, Village of Highland Park, Town of Hillcrest Heights, City of Lake Alfred, Town of Lake Hamilton, City of Lakeland, City of Lake Wales, City of Mulberry, Town of Polk City, City of Winter Haven
Lee County Florida - Bonita Springs, Cape Coral, Fort Myers, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel Hendry County Florida - Clewiston , Harlem, LaBelle, Port La Belle, Felda.
Collier County Florida - Everglades City, Marco Island, Naples

Disclaimer: The American Heart Association strongly promotes knowledge and proficiency in CPR, First Aid and AED use and has developed instructional materials for this purpose. Use of these materials in an educational course or mention of the American Heart Association name does not represent course sponsorship or product endorsement by the American Heart Association, and any fees charged for such a course do not represent income to the Association. 


Conditions that the Device Treats
An automated external defibrillator is used in cases of life threatening cardiac arrhythmias which lead to cardiac arrest. The rhythms that the device will treat are usually limited to:
Pulseless Ventricular tachycardia (shortened to VT or V-Tach)[1]
Ventricular fibrillation (shortened to VF or V-Fib)

In each of these two types of shockable cardiac arrhythmia, the heart is active, but in a life-threatening, dysfunctional pattern. In ventricular tachycardia, the heart beats too fast to effectively pump blood. Ultimately, ventricular tachycardia leads to ventricular fibrillation. In ventricular fibrillation, the electrical activity of the heart becomes chaotic, preventing the ventricle from effectively pumping blood. The fibrillation in the heart decreases over time, and will eventually reach asystole.

AEDs, like all defibrillators, are not designed to shock asystole ('flat line' patterns) as this will not have a positive clinical outcome. The asystolic patient only has a chance of survival if, through a combination of CPR and cardiac stimulant drugs, one of the shockable rhythms can be established, which makes it imperative for CPR to be carried out prior to the arrival of a defibrillator.

Effect of Delayed Treatment
Uncorrected, these cardiac conditions (ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, asystole) rapidly lead to irreversible brain damage and death. After approximately three to five minutes,[3] irreversible brain/tissue damage may begin to occur. For every minute that a person in cardiac arrest goes without being successfully treated (by defibrillation), the chance of survival decreases by 10 percent.[4]
Requirements for Use
AEDs are designed to be used by laypersons who ideally should have received AED training. This is in contrast to more sophisticated manual and semi-automatic defibrillators used by health professionals, which can act as a pacemaker if the heart rate is too slow (bradycardia) and perform other functions which require a skilled operator able to read electrocardiograms.

Bras with a metal underwire and piercings on the torso must be removed before using the AED on someone to avoid interference.[5]
Placement and Availability
An AED at a railway station in Japan.Automated external defibrillators are generally either held by trained personnel who will attend events or are public access units which can be found in places including corporate and government offices, shopping centres, airports, restaurants, casinos, hotels, sports stadiums, schools and universities, community centers, fitness centers, health clubs, workplaces and any other location where people may congregate.

The location of a public access AED should take in to account where large groups of people gather, regardless of age or activity. Children as well as adults may fall victim to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)

In many areas, emergency vehicles are likely to carry AEDs, with some ambulances carrying an AED in addition to manual defibrillators. Police or fire vehicles often carry an AED for first responder use. Some areas have dedicated community first responders, who are volunteers tasked with keeping an AED and taking it to any victims in their area. AEDs are also increasingly common on commercial airlines, cruise ships, and other transportation facilities.

In order to make them highly visible, public access AEDs often are brightly colored, and are mounted in protective cases near the entrance of a building. When these protective cases are opened or the defibrillator is removed, some will sound a buzzer to alert nearby staff to their removal, though this does not necessarily summon emergency services; trained AED operators should know to phone for an ambulance when sending for or using an AED. In September 2008, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation issued a 'universal AED sign' to be adopted throughout the world to indicate the presence of an AED, and this is shown at right.[6]

A trend that is developing is the purchase of AEDs to be used in the home, particularly by those with known existing heart conditions.[7] The number of devices in the community has grown as prices have fallen to affordable levels. There has been some concern among medical professionals that these home users do not necessarily have appropriate training,[8] and many advocate the more widespread use of community responders, who can be appropriately trained and managed.

Typically, an AED kit will contain a face shield for providing a barrier between patient and first aider during rescue breathing; a pair of nitrile rubber gloves; a pair of trauma shears for cutting through a patient's clothing to expose the chest; a small towel for wiping away any moisture on the chest, and a razor for shaving those with very hairy chests.[9]

Preparation for operation
Most manufacturers recommend checking the AED before every period of duty or on a regular basis for fixed units. Some units need to be switched on in order to perform a self check; other models have a self check system built in with a visible indicator.[citation needed]

All manufacturers mark their pads with an expiry date, and it is important to ensure that the pads are in date. This is usually marked on the outside of the pads. Some models are designed to make this date visible through a 'window', although others will require the opening of the case to find the date stamp.[citation needed]

Mechanism of operation
The use of easily visible status indicator and pad expiration date on one model of AEDAn AED is external because the operator applies the electrode pads to the bare chest of the victim, as opposed to internal defibrillators, which have electrodes surgically implanted inside the body of a patient.

Automatic refers to the unit's ability to autonomously analyse the patient's condition, and to assist this, the vast majority of units have spoken prompts, and some may also have visual displays to instruct the user.

When turned on or opened, the AED will instruct the user to connect the electrodes (pads) to the patient. Once the pads are attached, everyone should avoid touching the patient so as to avoid false readings by the unit. The pads allow the AED to examine the electrical output from the heart and determine if the patient is in a shockable rhythm (either ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia). If the device determines that a shock is warranted, it will use the battery to charge its internal capacitor in preparation to deliver the shock. This system is not only safer (charging only when required), but also allows for a faster delivery of the electrical current.

When charged, the device instructs the user to ensure no one is touching the victim and then to press a button to deliver the shock; human intervention is usually required to deliver the shock to the patient in order to avoid the possibility of accidental injury to another person (which can result from a responder or bystander touching the patient at the time of the shock). Depending on the manufacturer and particular model, after the shock is delivered most devices will analyze the victim and either instruct that CPR be given, or administer another shock.

Many AED units have an 'event memory' which store the ECG of the patient along with details of the time the unit was activated and the number and strength of any shocks delivered. Some units also have voice recording abilities[citation needed] to monitor the actions taken by the personnel in order to ascertain if these had any impact on the survival outcome. All this recorded data can be either downloaded to a computer or printed out so that the providing organisation or responsible body is able to see the effectiveness of both CPR and defibrillation.

AEDs available to the public may be semi-automatic or fully automatic. Fully automatic units are likely to have few buttons, often activating as soon as the case is opened, and possibly just one button to shock, or in some cases this will be performed automatically. The user has no input in the operation of the unit apart from attaching the pads and following the prompts. Health care professionals and other trained responders may use a semi-automatic defibrillator, which is likely to have an ECG readout display, and the possibility to override the rhythm analysis software. This allows trained personnel to provide a higher level of care.

The first commercially available AEDs were all of a monophasic type, which gave a high-energy shock, up to 360 to 400 joules depending on the model. This caused increased cardiac injury and in some cases second and third-degree burns around the shock pad sites. Newer AEDs (manufactured after late 2003) have tended to utilise biphasic algorithms which give two sequential lower-energy shocks of 120 - 200 joules, with each shock moving in an opposite polarity between the pads. This lower-energy waveform has proven more effective in clinical tests, as well as offering a reduced rate of complications and reduced recovery time.[10]

Simplicity of use
Usual placement of pads on chest.  Unlike regular defibrillators, an automated external defibrillator requires minimal training to use. It automatically diagnoses the heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed. Automatic models will administer the shock without the user's command. Semi-automatic models will tell the user that a shock is needed, but the user must tell the machine to do so, usually by pressing a button. In most circumstances, the user cannot override a "no shock" advisory by an AED. Some AEDs may be used on children - those under 55 lbs (25 kg) in weight or under age 8. If a particular model of AED is approved for pediatric use, all that is required is the use of more appropriate pads. Some organizations, such as the American Heart Association, recommend that if pediatric AED pads are not available, adult pads should be used to determine if the child is in a shockable rhythm. There is insufficient evidence to suggest that a child, in a shockable cardiac arrest, can be "hurt" by an adult defibrillation energy setting.[citation needed]

All AEDs approved for use in the United States use an electronic voice to prompt users through each step. Because the user of an AED may be hearing impaired, many AEDs now include visual prompts as well. Most units are designed for use by non-medical operators. Their ease of use has given rise to the notion of public access defibrillation (PAD), which experts agree has the potential to be the single greatest advance in the treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest since the invention of CPR.[11]

Automated external defibrillators are now easy enough to use that most states in the United States include the "good faith" use of an AED by any person under the Good Samaritan laws.[12] "Good faith" protection under a Good Samaritan law means that a volunteer responder (not acting as a part of one's occupation) cannot be held civilly liable for the harm or death of a victim by providing improper or inadequate care, given that the harm or death was not intentional and the responder was acting within the limits of their training and in good faith. In the United States, Good Samaritan laws provide some protection for the use of AEDs by trained and untrained responders.[13] AEDs create little liability if used correctly;[14] NREMT-B and many state EMT training and many CPR classes incorporate or offer AED education as a part of their program. In addition to Good Samaritan laws, Ontario, Canada also has the "Chase McEachern Act (Heart Defibrillator Civil Liability), 2007 (Bill 171 – Subsection N)", passed in June, 2007,[15] which protects individuals from liability for damages that may occur from their use of an AED to save someone's life at the immediate scene of an emergency unless damages are caused by gross negligence